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The Origins of Valentine's Day

February 13th, 2019

When we think of Valentine’s Day, we think of cards, flowers, and chocolates. We think of girlfriends celebrating being single together and couples celebrating their relationship. We think of all things pink and red taking over every pharmacy and grocery store imaginable. But what Dr. Betsy Meade and our team would like to think of is when and how this joyous, love-filled day began.

Several martyrs’ stories are associated with the origins of Valentine’s Day. One of the most widely known suggests that Valentine was a Roman priest who went against the law at a time when marriage had been banned for young men. He continued to perform marriage ceremonies for young lovers in secret and when he was discovered, he was sentenced to death.

Another tale claims that Valentine was killed for helping Christians escape from Roman prisons. Yet another says that Valentine himself sent the first valentine when he fell in love with a girl and sent her a letter and signed it, “From your Valentine.”

Other claims suggest that it all began when Geoffrey Chaucer, an Englishman often referred to as the father of English literature, wrote a poem that was the first to connect St. Valentine to romance. From there, it evolved into a day when lovers would express their feelings for each other. Cue the flowers, sweets, and cards!

Regardless of where the holiday came from, these stories all have one thing in common: They celebrate the love we are capable of as human beings. And though that’s largely in a romantic spirit these days, it doesn’t have to be. You could celebrate love for a sister, a friend, a parent, even a pet.

We hope all our patients know how much we love them! Wishing you all a very happy Valentine’s Day from the team at Meade Orthodontics!

What is a palatal expander?

January 30th, 2019

Orthodontists like Dr. Betsy Meade recommend a first orthodontic visit and evaluation for your child around the age of seven. We will evaluate your child’s jaw and facial development and make sure that there is enough room in the mouth for the permanent teeth when they arrive. One of the recommendations we might make for early treatment is the use of a palatal expander. If you are unfamiliar with this device, let’s take a closer look at why it’s necessary and what exactly it does.

Why do we recommend the palatal expander?

There are two dental arches, composed of the upper and the lower teeth, in your child’s mouth. This arch-shaped design is meant to accommodate all the permanent teeth. Further, when the upper and lower teeth meet, they should result in a healthy occlusion, or bite.

Sometimes, the upper dental arch is simply too small to accommodate all of your child’s permanent teeth, leading to crowding, extractions, and impacted teeth. Also, a too-narrow arch can result in a crossbite, where some of the upper teeth bite inside the lower ones. An improper bite can lead to problems such as TMJ (temporomandibular joint) disorder, improper wear and stress on teeth, certain speech difficulties, and other potential complications. The palatal expander was designed to prevent these problems from occurring.

What is a palatal expander and how does it work?

The expander itself is a device that increases the size of the upper dental arch. Before your child’s bones are finished growing, the space between the two bones of the upper palate is filled with cartilage. This tissue is flexible when children are young, but gradually fuses solidly into place by the time they are finished growing (usually in the early to mid-teens). If the arch can be widened to accommodate the emerging permanent teeth, or to reduce malocclusions, this improvement can also affect the need for, and length of, future dental work.

There are several types of expanders available at our Ypsilanti, MI office. These are custom-made appliances, commonly attached between the upper teeth on each side of the jaw. The two halves of the device are connected with a screw-type mechanism that can be adjusted to widen the upper palate and dental arch with gentle pressure. This is a gradual process, with small adjustments usually made once or twice a day to slowly move the bones further apart. As weeks go by, you will notice a successful change in the spacing of the teeth. Your child might even develop a gap in the front teeth, which is normal and will generally close on its own.

If you would like more detailed information, talk to Dr. Betsy Meade about the palate expander. We can tell you what to expect from this treatment if we think it is best for your child’s unique needs, and how to make it as easy as possible for your child. Our goal is to provide your child with the healthiest teeth and bite possible, always making use of treatments that are both gentle and effective.

Are lingual braces for you?

January 23rd, 2019

Lingual braces are one of the most subtle ways to transform your smile. Because the brackets and wires are attached to the inside of your teeth, there is almost no visible sign that you are wearing braces. If this is an important consideration for you for personal or professional reasons, this advantage might make lingual braces your best choice for orthodontic treatment.

Every method of straightening teeth also presents potential disadvantages to consider. In the case of lingual braces, patients should be aware of some issues both similar to and different from those posed by regular braces.

  • Tongue Sensitivity

Just as your lip and cheek areas need to get used to typical front-facing braces, your tongue might be sensitive at first to lingual braces. The same orthodontic wax that protects your lips and mouth from irritation caused by metal brackets and wires on the front of teeth can also be used to reduce the tongue irritation caused by brackets behind your teeth.

  • Speech Difficulties

Since your tongue will not be hitting the backs of your teeth in the usual way, you might find some initial difficulty pronouncing words properly. This problem usually disappears over time. Practicing speaking aloud will help your tongue adjust to your new braces. Talk to us if this is a special concern for you.

  • Eating/Cleaning Teeth

Just as with regular braces, you will need to avoid any foods that can damage your orthodontic work. All the usual culprits, such as caramel, hard candy, and popcorn, should be avoided with any type of braces. But because lingual braces are inside the teeth, they can be trickier to clean. Careful brushing and flossing are still vital, and we have suggestions for making sure your lingual braces are free from food particles and plaque.

  • Time

Lingual braces can require a slightly longer treatment schedule. We can let you know the approximate treatment times for whatever orthodontic plans you are considering.

  • Cost

Because lingual braces are customized to fit you, they can be somewhat pricier than other options.

We have the special training and skill needed to provide you with lingual braces if that is the option that you choose. We also have suggestions for adjusting to your lingual braces comfortably and making them work for you. Talk to Dr. Betsy Meade at our Ypsilanti, MI office about all the possibilities for straightening your teeth, including any potential concerns or advantages each treatment method presents. If you would prefer that your braces be almost unnoticeable, that advantage might be the deciding factor in making lingual braces the ideal choice for you.

Does my child need two-phase treatment?

January 16th, 2019

You might be surprised to see one of your second grader’s friends with a dental appliance. Isn’t orthodontic work just for teenagers? And, if not, should your seven-year-old be sporting braces right now? The answer to both of those questions is “Not necessarily.” Two-phase treatment is a process designed to correct issues that arise during different times in your child’s life.

First Phase Treatment

We recommend that every child have an orthodontic evaluation around the age of seven to determine if there is a problem that would benefit from early treatment. First phase orthodontics is not the same as orthodontics for older patients. The focus here is on the developing bone and muscle structures which form your child’s bite and provide space for the permanent teeth when they arrive.

There are some clear-cut orthodontic goals that are much easier to attain when children’s bones are still growing.

  • Reducing Crowding

If your child’s mouth is small, the permanent teeth will have little room to fit in when they arrive. We may recommend gently enlarging the upper dental arch with the use of a palatal expander. This device will provide room for the adult teeth, and could potentially shorten second phase treatment time. Sometimes the extractions necessary to create more room for permanent teeth in later years can be avoided, as well as the possibility of an impacted tooth—one which doesn’t erupt because it is blocked by other teeth.

  • Dealing with Jaw and Bite Concerns

Bones and muscles do not always develop properly, leading to problems with jaw and facial structure. Your younger child still has growing bones, so this is a great time to gently re-form the jaw into a healthy shape. Problems caused by crossbites, underbites, open bites, and other malocclusions can be reduced with early treatment.  

  • Protecting Teeth

If your child has protruding front teeth, these teeth are more likely to be damaged in falls, at play, or while participating in sports. We can gently reposition them.

Second Phase Treatment

Second phase treatment is designed for your older child. After a resting period, when the permanent teeth finish erupting, we should see your child to evaluate any further orthodontic needs. This is the time to finish the process of straightening the teeth and making sure that each tooth fits together properly for a comfortable and healthy bite. This phase usually makes use of braces or aligners, and can take approximately 12-24 months.

Two-phase treatment is not necessary for every child. But there are some unique reasons that early orthodontics might be recommended for your child, even if it’s clear that more orthodontic work will be needed later. Make an appointment with Dr. Betsy Meade at our Ypsilanti, MI office, and let’s evaluate your child’s orthodontic needs, whether now or in the future, for a lifetime of beautiful smiles.

What Our Patients Are Saying

  • "My best experience at this office was when my son was diagnosed with Leukemia at 11 years old and I was a complete wreck. The office staff sent a bouquet of cookies for us. Dr. Meade is so amazing. She has been a TRUE blessing through this process. Love this office and their hospitality." – William L.

  • "The staff are friendly and courteous. The doctor is great and very experienced. The environment is neat and clean. My children and I are very happy to go there.". – Ghada A.

  • "The first appointment was the best. Everything was explained clearly. Walking into a complete unknown about the procedure was very stressful for Angela and me. The staff made us feel at home and we left with a solid plan. Angela now looks forward to coming to the Meade office with no fear. You are doing everything right." – Angela B.

  • "It is always a pleasant experience going into the office. All the staff take the time to say hi or chat for a minute even if they are not directly working with you that day. It's a very relaxing, stress-free environment." – Joseph M.

  • "From the initial appointment and evaluation to making the subsequent appointments and each appointment thereafter. Everyone is lovely yet efficient. We feel part of the family. We also love the festive atmosphere. Great job!" – Briella S.

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